DOTS FOR ADELAIDE, LIGHT


Adelaide Festival, Blinc,,
Festival Building and Parliament Building,
Adelaide, Australien

projection onto Festival Building
 
sound: Zinkl
artistic director: David Sefton
curator: Craig Morrison
technical director: Mark Pennington
opening 27th February 2015
festival duration: 17.2. – 15.3.2105

Dots placed next to one another generate a line. Parallel lines form a surface.
Surfaces positioned in the third dimension describe a space. In this way, the simple dot becomes the germ cell, the starting point of every design.
As with the Big Bang, potentialities arise out of nothingness. A point bears within itself the sum of all worlds. Its colour and size, its movement in space, all of these become part of an organic whole.
DOTS FOR ADELAIDE tells the story of this genesis. The subsequent transformation of the dots into letters, the transformation of the smallest unit of the image into the smallest unit of script, attests to the evolution of sign into substance, thoughts, ideas and dreams.
As in many indigenous people and tribes the point or dot also belongs with to the indigenous of Australia as a firm component of their artistic expression.

DOTS FOR ADELAIDE erzählt von dieser Genesis. Die anschließende Transformation der Punkte zu Buchstaben, der Wandel der kleinsten Bildeinheit zu den kleinsten Schrifteinheiten zeugt von der Evolution der Zeichen zu Inhalten, Gedanken, Ideen und Träumen.
Wie bei vielen indigenen Völkern gehört der Punkt auch bei den Ureinwohnern Australiens zum festen Bestandteil ihrer gestalterischen Formensprache.

Light
 
projektion on Parliament Building
 
sound: Bradford Catler
artistic director: David Sefton
curator: Craig Morrison
technical director: Mark Pennington
opening 27th February 2015
festival duration: 17.2. – 15.3.2105
 

Textures composed of the word light — in four different languages: English, Chinese, Arabic and Kauna — are projected onto the rear façade of the parliament building in the centre of Adelaide. Kauna is a local indigenous language that is considered to have died out. It is currently being painstakingly reconstructed by Rob Amery, a professor at the university in Adelaide, using a dictionary compiled by two early 19thcentury German missionaries.
Kardlayirdi is the Kauna word for light. It derives from the word Kardla, which means fire. The ornamental play of these typographical signs and structures attests to the similarities &mdash and differences &mdash of the people and cultures who come together in Australia.